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What is a right to work share code?

A right to work share code is a unique 9-character alphanumeric code generated via the UK Government website Prove your right to work to an employer: Overview – GOV.UK (www.gov.uk). This initiative has been implemented by the UK Government to verify an individual’s right to work online. Consequently, employers can verify their employees right to work status digitally rather than relying on paper documents.

Eligible migrant workers provide a right to work share code to their employers to prove their right to work in the UK.

Please read further for detailed guidance on generating your right to work share code on the Home Office website.

How to generate a right to work share code?

To generate a right to work share code, a worker will need a Biometric Residence Permit (BRP), Biometric Residence Card (BRC), Passport, or National Identity Card.

Individuals can generate a right to work share code via either one of the following:

UKVI Account

A UK Visas and Immigration account or ‘UKVI account’ is created on the Government website and maintained by the government throughout an individual’s residence in the UK. This is the main online resource for individuals to update and view their online immigration status and make changes if necessary. By logging into your UKVI Account you will be redirected to a page generating right to work share codes as and when needed.

EU Settlement Scheme (EUSS)

If you have status under the EU Settlement Scheme (EUSS), you can apply via the EUSS app for a right to work share code.

Biometric Residence Permit (BRP)

A Biometric Residence Permit is the most common way for many work and student visa holders to confirm their identity and right to work in the UK. Physical BRPs alone are no longer valid to prove your right to work in the UK; however, they can be used via the Prove your right to work to an employer: Overview – GOV.UK (www.gov.uk) to apply for a right to work share code.

Monica Mastropasqua

Paralegal

View profile

+44 20 7539 8021

Eligible migrant workers provide a right to work share code to their employers to prove their right to work in the UK.

How do I get a new right to work share code?

Step 1 

1. Click on this link: Prove your right to work to an employer: Get a share code online – GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

2. Select Start Now

3. Select the document which you would like to use to enter your account and generate your right to work share code. For the purpose of this guide, we will use a BRP card.

However, if you select either of the other 2 options, please ensure you insert the details of the passport or ID document used for your initial visa application.

4. Select Yes


5. Insert document number including letters

6. On the next page you will insert your date of birth.

7. You will then be directed to the final page where you will be able to see/create a right to work share code.

8. By clicking continue you will be able to see your right to work share code – for ease of reference I have attached an example below.

As you can see, at the bottom of the last page, to share the code with your employer you can either follow steps 1 to 3 or you can send the code by email.

Upon receiving a right to work share code, employers gain access to details regarding your eligibility to work and rights in the UK. Here are the aspects that an employer can verify:

  1. The types of works the candidate is carry out
  2. The duration of the applicant’s permit
  3. Whether the candidate has access to public services like the National Health Service (NHS)
  4. The rights of the applicant while residing and working in the UK, including any entitled UK benefits
  5. Whether the individual is lawfully entitled to open a bank account or apply for credit while living in the UK

Should you need any further guidance in obtaining your right to work share code, our team of immigration experts will be to help you. Please contact our UK Immigration Lawyers should you require further assistance.

About this article

Disclaimer
This information is for guidance purposes only and should not be regarded as a substitute for taking legal advice. Please refer to the full General Notices on our website.

Monica Mastropasqua

Paralegal

View profile

+44 20 7539 8021

About this article

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